La Ultima Cena – Dinner with Friends on Thursday

 

last-supper milano

No one can deny the powerful visual presence of da Vinci’s Last Supper, Il Cenacolo, the 15′ X 29′ fresco-like painting on the wall of the Dominican refectory in the Church of Santa Marie delle Grazie in Milan, Italy.  Completed in 1498 it is a powerful “take-your-breath away” moment depicting the last days spent with Christ and his closest friends. The various depictions of Jesus and the Apostles at the Last Supper have made it the most commonly painted meal in art history and the most famous dinner of all time. Relentlessly studied and scrutinized by art scholars and endlessly interpreted for a hidden codex and meaning, Leonardo’s Last Supper for me is a moment of simple conviviality that underlies a profound change in God’s relationship with man.

However it was not the first representation of la ultima cena. There were hundreds of “Last Suppers” painted long before Leonardo’s.

last-supper-ravenna

Sant’Apollinare Nuovo – Ravenna

A 6th century mosaic along the upper band of the right wall of the nave in the Church of Sant’Apollinare Nuovo, Ravenna is considered to be among the earliest images of the Last Supper (an earlier 3rd century composition can be found the Catacombs of Saint Calixtus in Rome). The event is typical of early Christian iconography and the traditions of the Eastern Church. Symbols with hidden meanings and mystical elements are incorporated in decorative mosaics to tell a story and convey a lesson in creating some of the most beautiful mosaics in Western civilization.

Here are a few other unique and touching depictions (ancient and modern) of this dinner with friends that changed the world.

last-supper- altar dossal 1633

Embroidered Altar Dossal – 1633.

last supper

Giotto – Last Supper Scrovegni Chapel, Padua, Italy 1305-1306

Stanley Spencer Last Supper

The Last Supper, Stanley Spencer 1891-1959.

last supper icon early 14 c

Holy and Great Thursday. The Mystical (Last) Supper. Early 14th c. Icon.

last-supper- sado

The Last Supper by Sadao Watanabe (1981).

last-supper father

The Last Supper by priest-painter, Father Sieger Köder.

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In an Italian Weaver’s Cooperative Lives the Spirit of Festa della Donna

mimosa long

March 8 is International Women’s Day, a global initiative that celebrates the social, economic and political achievements of women past, present and future. On this day the world joins hands together to support, raise, inspire and motivate women across all fields of work. In Italy the day is celebrated as Festa della Donna and fragrant bouquets of bright yellow mimosa are found everywhere as a symbol of support and appreciation for women and all they do.

Giuditta_Brozzetti_1Over the centuries there have been many notable Italian women who have served as inspiring examples to all. Women dedicated to their families, their parents, husbands and children with talents that have extended within and beyond their communities and enriched the common culture of our world. One such woman was Giuditta Brozzetti whose name remains attached to the weaving cooperative she founded in the Northern Italian city of Perugia.

Her story begins in the middle of the First World War. As director of elementary schools for the city of Perugia she traveled the region visiting the village schools and passing farmhouses where women working in the fields tended to the animals and harvested crops to provide for themselves and their families as their husbands, brothers and fathers were at war. Brozzetti also noted that women in the villages were skilled weavers working on antique wooden looms hand-weaving textiles in the traditional way producing fabrics and ancient patterns of great beauty. Impressed by what she saw and recognizing the value in the quality and craftsmanship of their work, Brozzetti began bringing the textiles to markets in Perugia, helping to create another form of income for the rural women.

textile 2

In 1921 Brozetti founded a workshop and school in Perugia to showcase the handwork of the village women and teach the traditional hand-weaving ways and heritage patterns that dated back to Umbria’s Medieval and Renaissance textile traditions.

 

textile churchToday in Perugia’s San Francesco delle Donne, a deconsecrated 13th-century church, the entrepreneurial spirit of Giuditta Brozzetti lives on as a community based women’s cooperative continuing the tradition of hand-weaving following the same intricate patterns as the originals, many created on antique pedal looms. Kept alive by generations of talented, committed, entrepreneurial women creating brilliant textiles that connect modern Perugia to its rich and invaluable heritage and past.